hotpointservice.co.uk bury marketing opt-out checkboxes (February 2011)

Posted & filed under Trick Questions.

Whilst registering a Hotpoint appliance at www.hotpointservice.co.uk I discovered a trick where opt-in checkboxes were buried beneath a click. The user is guided through the step-by-step registration process by entering their details and hitting continue. The user’s progress is marked with a progress bar above the content area. So far, so normal. However, at stage… Read more »

PCWorld.com trick questions (December 2010)

Posted & filed under Trick Questions.

As you can see in the screen grab below, when ordering online from PCworld.com, users are taken to the page shown below. The sentiment of the marketing checkboxes switches from opt-out to opt-in. Like with the Wired magazine example above, this design makes it likely that a certain percentage of users will sign up for… Read more »

Costco.com Uses Negative Check Box Tactic (November 18th, 2010)

Posted & filed under Trick Questions.

You can see in the image four typical uses of the checkbox form control but one sticks out. It conveniently omits the word “Yes” and is unusually more verbose than the surrounding checkboxes. Reading the second sentence reveals Costco’s dark intention. It reads (emphasis added): “Check here if you do not want to receive these… Read more »

next.co.uk free delivery / paid catalogue wordplay (September 2010)

Posted & filed under Trick Questions.

When buying any item from next.co.uk, the checkout page presents a tricky selection of options regarding “free/paid” delivery and a “free/paid” catalogue, as shown below. Note the confusing interplay between what’s free and what’s paid-for. The first radio button (preselected) reads “Give me FREE delivery with this order and send me a copy of the… Read more »

GoCompare.com (August 2010)

Posted & filed under Trick Questions.

GoCompare hide their marketing-consent behind a “more info” link, as shown below: Gocompare.com screenshot Clicking on “please click here for more information” reveals the opt-out: Go Compare Screenshot 2 It is likely that a percentage of users will not notice the fact that they are defaulted to opt-in to marketing messages, since the checkbox is… Read more »

Ryanair trick insurance opt-out trick question (August 2010)

Posted & filed under Trick Questions.

This example was submitted by Lee McIvor (here). Ryan Air cleverly uses an Anti-scan trick question, shown below. What’s interesting about this pattern is that it gives the site owner plausible deniability: they can claim that when you read the words on the page, it’s entirely clear what’s being said, so what’s the problem? In… Read more »